Your search for 'Captain Robert Morgan' found:

Briefly about the Captain Robert Morgan:

Robert Clark Morgan (1798-1864) was born in Kent, England. He married Mary Dorrington in 1822, when he was 25 and she was 22. In February 1836 they had one surviving child, having lost several soon after birth, and Mary was expecting another. Morgan had joined the Royal Navy at the age of 11, and gone [...]

Read more about the Captain Robert Morgan

Journal Entries written by: Captain Robert Morgan

Thursday 25 February 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

10 AM left my family in the hand of God at home
[?with a]ll.things needful for life and godlynesse glory be to God
… my christian brother English in company we went on
[?boar]d of the A packet was a ship that ran a regular route between two ports and had a government contract to carry the mail, in this case powered by steam rather than sail. The ships also carried passengers and cargo and the mail contract was seen as a mark of their speed and reliability. steem packetand landed safe at gravesend where
Captn Pryn joined us and we came on board of the Duke of York
… after dinner all hands with most of the passengers assembled [?]
… on the quater deck haveing hoisted the Bethel flag…
… ist head we commenced the worship of God with singing

Captn Pryn offered a most affectionate prayer to
Allmighty God for us and all mankind many tears was shead
and I hope the seed sown that will be blessed of the Lord
without whose help the labourer laboureth in vain I went on
shore after service and bid farewell to my christian Bretheren
knowing not if I shall see them again in the flesh but God
knows that will surfice -

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 25 February 1836 ]


Saturday 27 February 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

came to anchor in about 15 A fathom is a measure of depth in the imperial system. One fathom is equal to six feet or 1.83 metres. fathoms water in the downs in the evening, assembled the officers and apprentices for prayers, read a chapter in Book of the Old Testament of the Bible. Proverbs  and commended ourselves to God.

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 27 February 1836 ]


Sunday 28 February 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After private prayer entered in the service of another
Sabath – different circumstanced than the last Sabath
at half past 6 weighed anchor and made sail down channel
with a fair wind I feel in the parth of my duty England I
love thy shores duty calls me from thee…

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 28 February 1836 ]


Tuesday 1 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This day commenced with strong winds and a heigh sea
the vessel verry laboursome and the sea beating over the
deck the dear passengers all sick the decks much lumbred
and the people dissatisfied as to the commencement of our
voyage at 11 AM made the land and took a  To navigate difficult stretches of water, ships took pilots on board. Pilots were coastal navigators with knowledge of their local waters and they captained the ship through the channel or harbour.pilot for the
Isle of white at 2 PM came to anchor at the mother bank
this afternoon blows verry hard gave 40 fathoms of cable
my communion with God has not bing so sweet as at other
times in the everning it blew a perfect gale let go the
seacond anchor and gave 70 fathoms of cable I experianced
how good and servesable this anchor is to the vessel
and how much more is Christ to the beliveing soul

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 1 March 1836 ]


Thursday 3 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

… recd[?] a letter from my beloved wife and child and bless God
for surporting her in the trying hour
… read the explanation of the
145th Psalm and lay down in peace

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 3 March 1836 ]


Friday 4 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After private prayer and Christain conversation
took boat and went to cows …
– blowing hard let go the seacond
anchor – sent a letter home to my beloved wife

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 4 March 1836 ]


Tuesday 8 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Extracts from letter, Captain Robert C Morgan
Recd March 9th 1836
G Fife Angas Esq
Jeffrey’s Square
St Mary Axe
London

Bark Duke of York March 8th 1836
off the Isle of Wight

Dear Sir

under a sense of the love and
favour of God I address these few lines to
You as the chief friend and counceler and
director in this important station of life
I am placed in both in regard to Yourself
and the Company how far I may give
satisfaction I know not but I look up
to God in Christ to be guided with
wisdom and grace …
we were compelled to put in here by
adverse winds and our time has bing
employd in getting ready for sea I have
kept the people and passengers on fresh meet
wile here beliving that to be both cheap
and best for the people and I likewise
I have got a few things here that we were
short off which I trust you will approve off
the wind is now fare from the North
and I hope by the blessing of Him who
hold the winds in His fists and holds
the waters in the hollow of is hand will
conduct us to our place of destine were
we may all fullfill our station of life
We use family service on board and keep
the Lords day and expect the Lords blessing
which He has allready favoured us with
Mr Stevens [illegible word] I belive to be a sincere
Christan and Mr Bear [Beare] I belive will prove
a serveseable man if spared to the
Company I still feel some anksierty
concerning the Ships Cofer if You can give
me any directions or council concerning it
the first oppertunity I will be glad
fare well dear Sir praying You and Yours
every blessing for time and Eternity for
our Redeemers sake Amen

Yours affectonately Robert C Morgan

Mr Stevens haveing nothing perticular to write
desires his respects Mr and Mrs Bear [Beare] and family
are all well the work men allso
we now have a fair wind and shall make
the best farewell Sir

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 8 March 1836 ]


Tuesday 8th March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

– received on board the To navigate difficult stretches of water, ships took pilots on board. Pilots were coastal navigators with knowledge of their local waters and they captained the ship through the channel or harbour. pilot  hove up …
anchors and made sail the wind at north I felt …
us for a letter but did not receve one tharefore I was led [to?]
trust and leave all in the hands of the God of all gra[ce?]
the cost of England looked delightfull as we sailed by
but soon it looked like a cloud at 7 PM tacked ship
Portland light in sight …

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 8th March 1836 ]


Friday 11 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

– I felt it a disappointment not receiveing a
letter from her I tenderly love the partner of my life …
sharer of my cares though so much absent from each other
which makes our parting so severly felt like cutting the
tender string of life or the divideing of vine and branch
I have wrote home but received no answer but belive all
will be well for time or Eternity thanks be to God and
His grace …

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 11 March 1836 ]


Saturday 12 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours blowing hard from the westward let go the
seacond anchor …
…  felt ankious not receiveing letter .

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 12 March 1836 ]


Thursday 17th March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]


it blows hard from the westward gave the cable to 45
fathoms gave the people some A magazine is like a newspaper. Captain Morgan may have been referring to small religious booklets in this instance. magazines  to read I felt
a desire to visit my beloved partner in this trying
time

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 17th March 1836 ]


Saturday 19th March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Rose early found the wind fair we got up the top Gt Masts are long poles that extend up vertically from the keel and deck of a ship. They carry the rigging, spars and sails by which ships are propelled. To achieve the desired height of the mast, upper sections called topmasts, topgallant masts and royal masts can be added. Ships and barques have three masts: the foremast at the front, the mainmast (which is the highest) and the mizzenmast at the back of the vessel. Brigs and schooners have two masts: the foremast and the mainmast. mast
and Yards are horizontal poles that are suspended from the masts to support and spread the square sails. They are basically set square to the ship’s centre line but the angle can be adjusted to suit the direction of the wind. yards  set up the rigin and hove up the The starboard is the right side of a ship or a boat perceived by a person on board facing the bow (front).The left side was originally called ‘larboard’ but in the early nineteenth century that term was replaced by ‘port’ to avoid the crew mis-hearing an order. The change was made official in 1844. starboard
anchor and got all ready for sea …

the wind fair duty calls I must go
however painfull leaveing a beloved partner close to the
Labour, childbirth. trying hour  of naturs sorrows but God omnipresent
omnipotent omnicent helpeth the seed of the woman
and gives grace to shout victory victory I had a letter
wrote to send to my beloved partner commending
her to that God and saivour who had done so much
for us beliveing he whould bless her keep her and sur
port her through all the trying seans of life great was
my joy when I recevead a letter to inform me by a
Christain brother I was father of a fine Girl and
Mother and child was likely to do well I will sing to
the Lord a new song for he doeth marvilous things …
…  my
gratitude is better felt at present than expressed I now
can give up my dear partner boy and baby to the all wise
God and saivour and go on my way rejoiceing at 4 PM got When a ship is under weigh it is in motion. The anchor has been raised or weighed. und
er weigh
 and made sail for sea light wind from the SE

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 19th March 1836 ]


Thursday 24 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Rose today dull and heavy after a nights tossing on the
mighty deep the wind from the SWd with a heigh sea AM
saw the land on the weather bow standing in for the
same PM took a Pilot on board at 5 came to anchor
in Torbay 7¼ fathoms water gave the Ship 40 fathoms of
cable …

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 24 March 1836 ]


Friday 25 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After commending my all to God and his grace
went to my days duty the wind from the SWd blowing
fresh gave the ship 20 fathoms more cable went on shore
with Mr Stevens went to the agent ordered a few neces
arys for the ship and passengers visited a pious fisherman
wife in our socierty and pertook of the humble fare …
… God
only knows what is before us therefore I commit all
into his care and keeping

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 25 March 1836 ]


Sunday 27 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After commending my all to God by reading and prayer praying for a good day for my soul before six in the forenoon assembled the people on the quater deck for prayer and hereing the word of God delivered a surmon from 3d Psalm 4th.5th verces I found it good to give thanks unto God [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 27 March 1836 ]


Monday 28 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

At half past 12 I told the pilot it was my opinion the seacond anchor aught to be let go which he allso assented he went foreward to let it go I heard the chain rattle thought it was the seacond anchor gone but to my surprise it was the cable broke from the stoppers [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 28 March 1836 ]


Tuesday 29 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

In the morning commended my all to God in christ the weather fine hove in some cable went on shore to the agent procured a carpenter to examine our wind lass who inspected it and will put it to rights we hove up the anchor and found we had ninety fathoms of cable out shifted [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 29 March 1836 ]


Wednesday 30 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After committing my all to God imperfectly in the name of a perfect saivour went on shore but it blew so hard the tradesmen could not come on board let go the streem anchor the pilots men got up the anchor and cable we parted from on monday morning in the afternoon the weather more [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 30 March 1836 ]


Thursday 31 March 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After commending my all to God myself and all duty and affection binds me to pray for commenced the days probation I felt anger at the negligence of those I aught to have sympathized with I need a continual watchfullness to pray for grace continually abounding grace – wind still westerly went on shore with [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 31 March 1836 ]


Friday 1 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

The wind at SE most of the ships in harbor got under weigh I went on shore to foreward the trades people four came off and others on shore fitting a chock for the windlass the blacksmiths doing thier work allso the wind shifted again to the westward and the rain fell in torents the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 1 April 1836 ]


Saturday 2 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours rain and snow decending the ship began to drive let go the seacond anchor afterward hove up both anchors to see them clear and let go the small bower and gave the ship 40 fathoms of cable the shipwrights employed repareing the windlass and mostly done in the everning had prayers with [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 2 April 1836 ]


Sunday 3 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After commending my all to God and his grace with reading and prayer – the blowing hard from the north let go the seacond anchor assem bled the people for prayer read with the church service an homly for easter day and sung three hymns suited I have need of the poets advice O may [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 3 April 1836 ]


Monday 4 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

At dawn of day I gave orders to the chief officer to get
up the seacond anchor he returned said the people
wished to speak with me after reading the word of
God as usall and commending my all to the God
of all grace I then went out to the people they
told me they whould not go out of the port
without monthly wages I said they aught to have
considered this before they signed When seafarers joined a ship they signed the articles. The captain signed them as well and they formed a contract that set out conditions of employment including how much crew would be paid, what food they would be given, and what hours they would be expected to work. The articles would also say that if a ship was in danger, the normal expectations of work would be set aside and the captain could call on his crew for whatever was needed to save the ship. The articles could form the basis for shipboard discipline, giving the captain authority to punish seafarers who broke them. articles I
asked them if they whould move the ship in
a safe place or a safe harbour they refused
to sail out of torbay Mr Stevens read the articles to them
Mr Stevens and myself went on shore for advice
from the Shipping agents provide local knowledge and represent ships in port. Their job is to provide anything that a ship might need. They may arrange a pilot to navigate a ship out of port, arrange clearances from customs or buy stores from local suppliers. agent came on board and offered
the people fivety pounds if they would proced
and if Whales came in the way to heave all
lumber over board that whould stop us Whale
ing for that was thier princable grevance but
they refused and whould not remove the ship
to a safe harbour Mr Stevens went on shore
went to Dartmouth and returned with Captn
Talbert of the royal navy and Mr Inkston
Loyds agent he had on his uniform with his
men with A pair of pistols. brace of pistols he called for me
to bring the articles and call the mens names
over I did so he asked the men if they signed
these When seafarers joined a ship they signed the articles. The captain signed them as well and they formed a contract that set out conditions of employment including how much crew would be paid, what food they would be given, and what hours they would be expected to work. The articles would also say that if a ship was in danger, the normal expectations of work would be set aside and the captain could call on his crew for whatever was needed to save the ship. The articles could form the basis for shipboard discipline, giving the captain authority to punish seafarers who broke them. articles which they replyd they did
he questioned them if they had any complaints
to make of my conduct towards them they
said no they where satisfied with the ship and
officers said the desipleing was good Captn
Talbert took Prichard the ringleader on shore with him
all the rest on board with the exception of Riley agreed
to go to thier duty – …

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 4 April 1836 ]


Tuesday 5 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After commending my all to God and his grace
with reading and praying wrote aletter to my
wife and employers – the people all on duty
doing it with appearant chearfulness James Riley
left last night and Prichard was sencanced to
twenty one days imprisonment I went on shore
ordered some oil and candles and pertatoes received
them on board the wind still SW …

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 5 April 1836 ]


Wednesday 6 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After reading and praying entered on the duty of the day went on shore closed the accounts with the agents and other bills after spent some time with my christain friends pertook of the bounties of thare table temporal fed with them speritual they have bing good and kind to me may the Lord reward [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 6 April 1836 ]


Thursday 7 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

First part squally with heavy rain the wind from the westward close reeft the fore top sail and hauld the main sail up at daylight more mod erate made sail made sail close in with the land ceveral sail sight PM an increaceing breese at midnight heavy squalls took in the fore top sail and [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 7 April 1836 ]


Friday 8 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Hard gales and a heigh sea under a reefd fore sail and close reeft fore and main top sails at 5 AM wore ship the land bearing NNW Ship labouring hard standing in for the land at 10 the start point bearing NE by N wind NW stood in for torbay at 10 came to [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 8 April 1836 ]


Saturday 9 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

In the morning employd variously gitting ready for sea the wind baffling from the NW and NEd I went on shore received letters which informed me my wife and little ones where well so either too hath helped us the weather and wind not being settled did not get under weigh had prayers in the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 9 April 1836 ]


Sunday 10 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

I rose this morning under some stress of mind
conserning the path of duty the wind fair
from the NE all ships out of the harbour
but our own I have experianced what it is
to be here in destress blowing from the SE
with a heigh sea I went on my knees and prayed to be
directed in the right way I afterwards consulted with
the mate we went on our knees togather and prayed
fervently to be directed the right way …

…  the wind blow
ing in the bay and likely to increase I felt my
mind easey when I thought of sailing out but
otherwise when of staying I read the 121th Psalm
and gave orders for gitting under weigh we weigh
ed anchor and made sail down chanel with a
fine and pleasant breese from the eastward all
on board seemd to enjoy the fine weather and fair
wind after upwards of six weeks contrary winds

I bid adewe to old England again
and those I love dearly as my own soul home is
all that sweetings like it speaks the warm affection
of a wife or the lisping babe that pratles on the knee with
all the joys of infantcy
at 8 PM the edistone light bore by compass ENE distance
about 6 A league is a measure of distance in the imperial system. At sea a league equals three nautical miles or 5.56 kilometres. leagues fine plesent weather all sail set

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 10 April 1836 ]


Monday 11 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Riseing at six after a quiet calm night read and prayed and went through the day with some thoughts of God and his grace but in the everning had my soul abundantly blessed in reading the scriptures and a pasage in the tract magazine and sung two hymns concluded with prayer sung praise God from [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 11 April 1836 ]


Tuesday 12 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

After reading and praying still find my sperits dull and heavy the atmisphere is dense I think has great power over the humane system but Gods holy word inlivens the frame of nature the wind from the NWd with hazy weather ceveral sail in sight in the everning a few attended read a chapter by [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 12 April 1836 ]


Wednesday 13 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most of this 24 hours strong winds and cloudy weather with all resquisite sail set at half past 7 tackd ship to the North and duble reeft the      at 7 PM and tackd again to day ceveral sail in sight people employd variously Lattd Obsd 49.12 N Longitud by chro 5.58 West In the morning [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 13 April 1836 ]


Thursday 14 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

At half past 3 AM Ships could not sail directly into the wind, but they could sail across it at angles. So, to move forward in the direction of the wind they set a zigzag course, sailing across the wind at alternating angles. That course was called tacking. Tackd ship to the SWd signalaized
a ship named ganges bound to Mauritius bark
rigged we The action or process of measuring the depth of water with a sounding line, a line marked at intervals of fathoms and weighted at one end. A fathom is a unit of length equal to 6 feet (1.83 metres). sounded at 85 A fathom is a measure of depth in the imperial system. One fathom is equal to six feet or 1.83 metres. fathoms water sand and
shells              Lattd Obsd 48.41 N Longd 6.30 west

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 14 April 1836 ]


Friday 15 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the eastward all posable sail set at 9 AM saw what we surposed to be a wreck lowered a boat pulled towards it and it proved to be a fishing boat with her mast struck bore up and made sail ceveral sail in sight emp loyd gitting up water  [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 15 April 1836 ]


Saturday 16 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours cloudy weather though plesent wind
ENE increaseing employd putting down the salt
provisions we had on deck in the place of in the room of water we
got up we unbent the chain from the Anchor put
the cables below and cleaned down the decks
Lattd Obs 46.48 North Long 9.26 West

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 16 April 1836 ]


Sunday 17 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours a moderate gale from the NEd all drawing sail set steering SW by W with a heigh sea a strange sail in sight Latt Obsd 44.36 North Long 12.6 West I had little or no sleep dureing the night in the morning went to my speritual dutys in much [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 17 April 1836 ]


Monday 18 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

All this 24 hours strong winds with a heigh sea
the wind ENE with a heigh sea steering SW
shiped great quantities of water on deck – allowanced
About 1.5 litres three quats of water a man per day to all hands

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 18 April 1836 ]


Tuesday 19 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the NEd all sail
set two topmast two lower two The topgallant mast (pronounced and sometimes written t’gallant) is the mast immediately above the topmast, or an extension of the topmast. top Gallt  Studding sails were set outside the square sails in fine weather and with a fair wind. Their head was fastened to a short yard hoisted to the end of the upper yard and their foot extended by a boom slid out from the lower yard. They took their name, such as main topmast studding sail, from the adjacent sail. studing sails
set steering SW by W fillid a fourty gall cask of water
to last the passengers and crew twenty four hours
with passengers  Lattd Obsd 39.20 N Long 15.21 West

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 19 April 1836 ]


Wednesday 20 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses and cloudy weather
wind from the NEd saw a strange sail PM took
in all the Studding sails were set outside the square sails in fine weather and with a fair wind. Their head was fastened to a short yard hoisted to the end of the upper yard and their foot extended by a boom slid out from the lower yard. They took their name, such as main topmast studding sail, from the adjacent sail studingsails and run under To progress comfortably under sail suited to the conditions easy sail
Lattd 36.53 N Long 15.34 West
In watching this morning for a Meridian altitude is a method of astronomical navigation used to calculate ones latitude on earth, in this case the latitude of a ship at sea. Using a nautical almanac to determine an estimated time of the meridian altitude of a planet or star, a ship’s captain would then use a sextant to track the object’s altitude for a few minutes before and during its pass through the meridian (in the case of the sun this was usually at noon). meridian altd , she
kept clouded well I thought God (from the Hebrew) Jehovah could cause those
clouds to disperce but still I do nont look for it nor
expect it but the clouds cleared away just time
anough for me to git a good altd

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 20 April 1836 ]


Thursday 21 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the ENE all sail set steering SW people employed variously Lattd Obsd 32.21 N Long 19.58 West In the everning had family prayers read the 8th chapt of Matthew with the tract commentry the mate and myself spoke to the people on devine things

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 21 April 1836 ]


Friday 22 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NEd all sail set steering SW people employed variously Lattd Obsd 32.21 N Longd 9.58 West In the everning had family prayer read the 8th chapt of St Matthew with tract commentry

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 22 April 1836 ]


Saturday 23 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours with passing squalls from the eastward steering SWd employed variously as needfull Lattd Obsd 30.12 N Longd 20.42 West Read in the morning the 12th chapt of St matthew/Luke with tract commentry read to the people assembled togath er in the everning in St Luke and a surmon on the rich farmer [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 23 April 1836 ]


Sunday 24 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the SEd all sail set steering SW PM obsd a distance between the À and Å which gives our longitude 22.42 West Lattd Obsd 27.47 North In the forenoon had devine service in the cabin on dock read a surmon of St Paul to Timothy 2nd epis 1 chapt 13th verce in [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 24 April 1836 ]


Monday 25 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

All this 24 hours light winds from the NEd all sail
set steering A bearing half a point south of south-west. SW½S and SW by S employed Extracting threads from old rope and knotting them together for further use. drawing
and knoting yarns
 makeing Sennit (correct spelling) is a flattened form of rope made by plaiting three or more rope-yarns together. senet boat sails
and grinding harpoons the cooper makeing Coopered wooden tubs in which the whale line attached to a harpoon was coiled ready for use in the whaleboats. line
tubs
 PM Observed the angle between the sun and moon, which was known as a ‘lunar distance’. Taken at a time related to the midday as determined by the sun’s passing, the longitude could then be calculated and use of this method was indicated by the symbol ‘À and Å’. Obsd a distance  between À and Å which
gives our Longd 23.59 West Lattd 25.52 North

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 25 April 1836 ]


Tuesday 26 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NEd all sails set steering from the SW by S people employd as yes terday about sundry jobs as needfull Lattd Obsd 23.53 N Longd 23.31 West I read the 25th chapt of Leviticus with tract commentry and had a sensible feeling of the sinfull state God by [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 26 April 1836 ]


Wednesday 27 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NEd all sail set steering SW employd as needfull makeing spunyarn cooper makeing line tubs carpenter fitting the boats ready for Whaling Lattd Obsd 21.44 North Long 23.57 West In the morning read a chapt in Leviticus with track commentry had many little things to try my graces [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 27 April 1836 ]


Thursday 28 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

All this 24 hours light winds from the NEd all sail set steering SW employd variously as needfull carryed away the larboard bolt split shroud    Lattd Obsd 19.25 N Longd 24.00 West In the everning read the 11th chapt of Hebrews with two Illustrations of scripture I belive the sperit of God to be working [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 28 April 1836 ]


Friday 29 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses from the NEd with clear weather all sail set steering SW at 7 AM saw the Island of Antoina bearing South by compass distance 8 leagues off a strange sail in sight employd setting up the lower topmast and top Gt riggin with bolt split shrouds cooper fitting line tubs [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 29 April 1836 ]


Saturday 30 April 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the eastward
plesent weather all sail set steering south
a strange sail in sight saw the Island of
Brava to The direction from which the wind blows. The other direction is termed ‘leeward’. windward the watch employed as need
full                                     Lattd 25.32 North

In the morning read the seacond chapt of
Leviticus … a few
attended and others was singing the songs of the
impious foreward

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 30 April 1836 ]


Sunday 1 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the eastward clear plesent weather all sail set steering S½ east      Lattd Obsd 12.45 North Longd 21.8 West I read in the morning the 1st chapt of galls with tract commentry in the forenoon read with the church service Christ on the mount 7th chapt of St Matthew gospel [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 1 May 1836 ]


Monday 2 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the eastward plesent weather all sail set steering S½E employed fitting the pertious blocks strops and other necesary work as required         Lattd Obsd 9.57 North Longd 23.50 West In the morning read the 5th chapt of Leviticus with tract commentry and dureing the day the life of Dr Herbert [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 2 May 1836 ]


Tuesday 3 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours the wind from the eastward gentle breeses and cloudy weather steering S by E employd fitting the Whaleing tackling saw black fish Lattd Obsd 7.30 N Longd 22.37 West We have made 2596 miles these last nine days read in the morning the 6th chapt of Leviticus with commentry at noon the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 3 May 1836 ]


Wednesday 4 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and plesent weather all sail set steering S by E and S by W employd fitting our Whaleing guier and doing other nesury work Lattd Obsd 5.52 N Longd 21.43 West Read a chapt in Job this morning and had my sperit uall strength renewed in the everning read the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 4 May 1836 ]


Thursday 5 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 light airs and Without wind. calms all sail set thundering
and lightning at times employd fitting Whaleing
guier saw a strange sail had a man at the The top of the mast. mast
head
 for the first time looking for Whales
Lattd Obsd 4.30 N Longd by chro 21.20 West
In the morning read the 9th chapt of Numbers with
commentry in the everning read the 24th chapt of
Joshua with parts of Mr Wesley surmon taken from
that chapt ten was present we sung and prayd
togather and no doubt most felt the love of God
in thier hearts and bless the God of all grace
we had a Mother restored to her husband and
four children after a hard strugle for life the
Lord had mercy on them and not only
them but me allso for how painfull whould have
bing the event I hope never to forget this event
the young man Glansford has bing ill I gave him
medicine and visited him and found him reading
a prayer book and token for good

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 5 May 1836 ]


Friday 6 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light airs and Without wind. calms with all draw
ing sail set employd as needfull a look out for
Whales saw none Lattd Obsd 4.00 N Longd 20.54 West
Read the scriptures after gitting up with prayer
and a short time after had to pass through another
scene likely to have given much pain a young man
son to a missionary in the east was batheing with
me over the quater of the ship carelessly let go the
rope knowing he could not swim which I did not
know he cryd out for me I see he was likely to
drownd I To throw overboard. hove over an oar and jumped over board
and with the assistance of another young man
who jumped after me we held him up till
they lowered a boat and picked us all up
this young missionarys son is I believe a Christ
ain prays to God continually the Lord saved
him his cry was Lord save me or I perish
Dangers stand thick all around to push us
to the tomb –  …

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 6 May 1836 ]


Saturday 7 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and squally weather with rain shortd and made sail as needfull employd about nessary work Lattd Obsd 3.42 N Longd 20.22 West I went down foreward and read the scriptures to the people with singing and prayer praying good may be done in the name of the saivour

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 7 May 1836 ]


Sunday 8 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses attended with squalls of rain and wind from the Southd Lattd Obsd 2.43 N Longd 19.38 West In the morning had secret prayer and commended my all to an offended God but allso a reconciled God through our Lord Jesus Christ – in the forenoon had worship on the quater [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 8 May 1836 ]


Monday 9 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the S E
all sail set people employd variously 2 sail
in sight AM Observed. Obsd  a distance between the À
and Å which gives our longd 20.9 West
Lattd 1.19 North
Commended my all to God in Christ in the
morning and went through the day stayd
on the promices of God in the evening the people
came aft to inquire if I whould let them go through
the Crossing the equator ceremony. usall costom of shaveing I told them I whould
not give my consent and stated the reason the first
was in a ship I was in when a boy we had one of the ablest
of the seaman drownded in drawing water to heave
over others the next was it was a beastly practice and
was attended in general with envy malice and other
ill consequences which I had known to create and
remain dureing a whole voyage  I whould not santion it
in the evening Mrs Richards, Glansford and myself had
prayers on the Technically a stern deck, the poop is an exposed partial deck on the stern (rear) of a ship. It forms the roof of the stern or ‘poop’ cabin. poop

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 9 May 1836 ]


Tuesday 10 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SSE plesent
weather all sail set steering SWd Observed. Obsd a distance bet
ween the À and Å gives our longitude 21.55 West
Lattd Obsd 30 miles South

in the afternoon the people came on deck and
commenced the Crossing the equator ceremony. old heathen practice of shaveing
which I disapproved off before them last night
they sluced ceveral with water and was going down
in the cabin to bring up the The area of between-decks occupied by steerage passengers, that is, those travelling at the cheapest rate. steerage passengers
which I prevented by steping foreward and stoping
they went away and broke up thier game my sperit
was greaved but I felt it my duty to stand before
the leaders of this affair and if a thousand had
bing before me I felt confident thet Lord was on
my side and I whould not fear what man could
do unto me …
in the afternoon the people stood in the midle of
the deck and gave three cheers for the Captn three
for the colonial manager and three for the passengers
afterward they where going through many mernuvers
on decks my mind at this time was better felt than
I could express it I felt and see what I once was like
could take delight in sutch what I now see to be foolish
ness I was once like them but now brought right to
God …

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 10 May 1836 ]


Wednesday 11 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours heavy squalls with rain carried away a studding sail boom three sail in sight AM Obsd a distance between the À and Å which gives our longd 23.24 West Lattd Obsd 2.7 South met in the everning for reading and praying six attended on our knees in prayer and read 13th chapt 1st [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 11 May 1836 ]


Thursday 12 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds and clear weather at 7 AM
To speak a ship is to communicate with it by voice or signals. spoke the Thomas Bell of new castle bound to swan
sea from valporaiso they whare short of bread
we suplyd them with three hundread weight
PM To speak a ship is to communicate with it by voice or signals. spoke the lady Mary Pellham belonging to the
The South Australian Company. company as ourselves Mr Stevens and myself went
on board found all well on board but had
lost the chief mate by hard drinking brought
on a brain fever which took him off in a most
horrid state of mind has left a widow on board
a stranger among a strange people going to a
strange land …

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 12 May 1836 ]


Friday 13 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses with squally weat her wind from the SEd steering SW all sail set Lady Mary Pellam in sight signallised to her        Lattd Obsd 5.47 S Longd 27.5 West In the everning had prayers in the cabin read the 5th chapt Pl Epistle to the Corrintians and tract commentry

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 13 May 1836 ]


Saturday 14 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses and clear weather all sail set steering SW wind SEd bent the seacond main sail the Lady Mary Pellam in sight Lattd Obsd 7.52 South Longd 27.5 West In the morning awoke and thought on the sacrefise for my sins and felt peace in beliveing on the sacrefice offered in [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 14 May 1836 ]


Sunday 15 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses and clear weather all sail set steering to the SWd the Lady Mary Pellam in sight PM spoke her the third mate came on board                    Lattd 9.49 S Longd 28.15 West In the morning prayed to have my heart and mind prepared for the receiveing  speritual blessings had the church [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 15 May 1836 ]


Monday 16 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SEd all sail set steering to the SWd employd as needfull the Lady Mary Pellam in sight Lattd Obsd 11.47 S L 29.3 W In the morning read the scriptures with prayer and a surmon from Matthew Henry some time after felt anger towards a christain brother asked [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 16 May 1836 ]


Tuesday 17 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses and clear weather all sail set steering to the South set up the mizen riging and employd as needfull the L M Pellam in sight Lattd Obsd 13.52 S Longd 28.58 West In the morning read a chapt in Job with prayer the text to day was To him that [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 17 May 1836 ]


Wednesday 18 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses attended with rain and squalls employd fitting top sails bent the top sails set up the main riging with the fore and main top mast rigin and back stays the L M Pellam in sight Latt Obsd 15.53 South Longd 28.35 West In the morning read the 39th 40th psalms [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 18 May 1836 ]


Thursday 19 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses with passing squalls from the eastward two sail in sight employd all day gitting up water Lattd Obsd 17.23 South Longd 27.13 West In the morning read a chapt from the epistle of Pl to the colloss with prayer – to day has bing a day of trial haveing to [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 19 May 1836 ]


Friday 20 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the NEd steeri
ng SE by E all sail set AM a Ships were generally classed by the way they were rigged for sail. A bark (also spelt barque) had: three masts, square sails on the front or forward mast square sails on the middle or main mast, and fore-and-aft sails on the back or mizzen mast. They were relatively small sailing ships in the 1830s.bark signerlised
her name the Alfred of Glassco bound to Batavia
the people employd as needfull Lattd Ob 18.23 South
Longd 25.26 West
…                                         I
find thare is a deal of bad feeling between
the The area of between-decks occupied by steerage passengers, that is, those travelling at the cheapest rate. steerage  passengers and the ships crew …

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 20 May 1836 ]


Saturday 21 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds inclined to calms all sail set employd as needfull PM obsd a distance between À and Ågives our longitude 24.4 West Latt Obsd 18.58 South In the morning read a portion of scripture in the everning assembled as many as whould come to the water of life read the 12th chapt of Daniel [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 21 May 1836 ]


Sunday 22 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light airs and variable inclined to calms all sail set as needfull 2 sail in sight surposed to be the Alfried and the L M Pellam                  Lattd Obsd 19.48 South In the morning read the word of God with part of an homly in private in the forenoon 16 met in our [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 22 May 1836 ]


Monday 23 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NEd all sail
set steering SE 2 sail in sight Longitude is the distance, measured in degrees, of the meridian on which a point lies to the meridian of Greenwich. On the other side of the earth to Greenwich is a point with a longitude of both 180 degrees east and 180 degrees west Longd  22.54 west by A ‘lunar distance’ was observed by measuring the angle between the sun and moon. Taken at a time related to the midday as determined by the sun’s passing, the longitude could then be calculated and use of this method was indicated by the symbol ‘À and Å’. lunar
Latitude is the distance of a point north or south of the equator as measured in degrees. The poles are at 90 degrees north and south. Lattd  Observed Obsd  20.13 South L 23.17 west by Chronometer. A chronometer is an instrument for accurately measuring time, important in navigation. A ship’s chronometer would be set at Greenwich Mean Time, and the difference between Greenwich Mean Time and noon at the location of the ship could be used to calculate longitude. chro

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 23 May 1836 ]


Tuesday 24 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses attend with squalls all sail set standing to the SE by S employd as needfull bent the old fore sail 2 sail in sight Lattd Obsd 21.10 South In the everning 8 attended read the 3d chapt of colossians and part of a surmon on the first by Joseph Beumont [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 24 May 1836 ]


Wednesday 25 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NW all sail set steering SE by E employd variously 2 sail in sight Lattd Obsd 21.47 South Longd by lunar 19.34 W Longd by chro 19.31 West In the everning 5 attended read part of the word of life by St John epist and part of a [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 25 May 1836 ]


Thursday 26 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses with passing A squall is a sudden, sharp increase in wind speed squalls
with rain all sail set steering to the SEd employd
as needfull served out clothes to the people Latitude is the distance of a point north or south of the equator as measured in degrees. The poles are at 90 degrees north and south. Lattd  Obsd 22.47 S
Longitude is the distance, measured in degrees, of the meridian on which a point lies to the meridian of Greenwich. On the other side of the earth to Greenwich is a point with a longitude of both 180 degrees east and 180 degrees west Longd  by Chronometer. A chronometer is an instrument for accurately measuring time, important in navigation. A ship’s chronometer would be set at Greenwich Mean Time, and the difference between Greenwich Mean Time and noon at the location of the ship could be used to calculate longitude. chro 17.23 West
Read the 51st chapt Isaiah on my knees with my heart lifted up
to God and fervently for my dear boy being His 7th birthday. seven years
since he had a being
 …

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 26 May 1836 ]


Friday 27 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours wind from the southd moderate breeses all sail set sent the fore top Gt yard down unbent the sail and bent another sent the yard up again Lattd Obsd 23.18 South Longd 13.44 West In the morning read the psalms for the day in the everning read to seven of the crew [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 27 May 1836 ]


Saturday 28 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours baffling winds from the eastward Tackd ship accationaly employd variously No Obsern In the morning read the psalms for the day in the everning read the 7th chapt of corrents with a tract the good Mothers legacy 7 attended the Lord manifasted himself to us as not to the world

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 28 May 1836 ]


Sunday 29 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds and cloudy weather all sail set standing to the SWd wind from the east ward with swell Latt Obsd 24.24 S Longd by chr 14.24 W In the morning read the psalms and prayd for a good sabath blessing the text to day was That yee stand fast in one [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 29 May 1836 ]


Monday 30 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SEd all resquisite sail set steering to the south employd as needful fitting a storm mizen Lattd Obsd 25.56 South Long by chro 15.6 West In the morning read the psalms for the day in the everning read the 23d chapt Term with a surmon on the Omnipresen [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 30 May 1836 ]


Tuesday 31 May 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours squally weather all sail set steering to the SEd wind from the NEd Lattd Obsd 27.11 South In the morning read the Psalms for the day in the everning read the same to the crew with a surmon from 2d correns 12th verce the enemy to day has bing as a flood [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 31 May 1836 ]


Wednesday 1 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses from the NNE all sail set steering SE employd as needfull mak eing gaskets Lattd Obsd 28.38 S Longd 12.11 West In the everning read the 6th chapt 2d cor with some obs ervations on profitable hereing the word three spo ke of of salvation in the morning read I [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 1 June 1836 ]


Thursday 2 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate and freshning breeses from the NEd all sail set steering SEd employd gitting up fresh water and filling salt Lattd 29.47 S Lon 9.11 W In the morning read the Psalms for the morning in the read the Psalms for the everning sung 2 hymns

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 2 June 1836 ]


Friday 3 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses and cloudy weather all sail set wind NNE steering SE got in the larbod quater boat Longd by chr 6.4 W Latt Obsd 31.1 South In the morning read the Psalms for the day in the everning read the Psalms for the same sung theree hyms read a surmon text [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 3 June 1836 ]


Saturday 4 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses from the NNE steer ing SE all sail set employd as needfull Longd 3.2 W Lattd Obsd 32.5 South In the morning read the Psalms for the day morning and praised God for a measure of health food and rament a beloved wife children two babes if a live for [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 4 June 1836 ]


Sunday 5 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses from the NWd
all drawing sail set steering SE
Latitude is the distance of a point north or south of the equator as measured in degrees. The poles are at 90 degrees north and south.Lattitude Obsd 33.7 S Longitude is the distance, measured in degrees, of the meridian on which a point lies to the meridian of Greenwich. On the other side of the earth to Greenwich is a point with a longitude of both 180 degrees east and 180 degrees west.Longitude the The meridian of Greenwich passes through the Royal Observatory there and has been adopted world-wide as the starting point for recording longitudes to the east and west of it.meridian of Greenwich
In the morning in private read the psalms for
the day morning with prayer in the forenoon in the
cabin went through the church service and read
a surmon from Books of sermons were quite common in the early nineteenth century and were used both privately and during religious services. The text for this particular sermon refers to the story in the Gospel According to St Luke, chapter 6, which compares a life of faith to building a house upon a solid foundation.Dr Walton Luke 6th chapt 46th 49th verce
I felt it a solemn and profitable time to my soul
and hope others did allso being on the meridian we
worshiped at the same time God people at home
did worship the great congregations a privalage
we may not have again on earth or sea God only
knows …

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 5 June 1836 ]


Monday 6 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses under duble reeft main top sail and single reeft fore top sail with reeft fore sail wind from the NN [sic] steering SE got in the starbo ard quater boat Longd by lunar 3.50 E by chr 2.31 E Lattd 34.4 South In the everning read to a few that [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 6 June 1836 ]


Tuesday 7 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

First part baffling winds from the SWd under short sail the got lighter made all resquite sail PM the wind freshning with rain Latt acc 34.47 S Longd 5.51 East This morning had the painfull task of seperating two of the crew from fighting but no sooner I came away but they went to it [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 7 June 1836 ]


Wednesday 8 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses inclined to light winds all resqusite sail set inclined to the westward bent the seacond main top sail and fore sail AM obsd a distance between the and  which gives our longitude 9.48 E Lattd Obsd 35.4 S In the everning read to as many of the crew as whould attend [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 8 June 1836 ]


Thursday 9 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours all sail set wind from the westward steering SEd employd as needfull no observation In the everning read to the people 3d chapt of Revs with a short surmon

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 9 June 1836 ]


Friday 10 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NW all drawing sail set steering SE AM obsd a distance between the and which gives our longitude 13.49 E  Lattd Obsd 35.47 South Read in private a chapt in Revers and bowed my knees before a throne of grace before God my saviour in the everning comenced [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 10 June 1836 ]


Saturday 11 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours a calm & from the SE a swell employd as needfull Longitude 15.52 East Lattd Obsd 36.7 South I read in the morning and found it a blessing a chapt in proverbs and found it a pained heart eased at a throne of grace in the everning read the 4th chapt Jerim [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 11 June 1836 ]


Sunday 12 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours the wind vearing from North to
west and and A squall is a sudden, sharp increase in wind speed. squally to a close Seafarers reduce sails in strong winds so that ships can move more safely and comfortably. Sails are made with rows of small ropes attached to them and these are tied around spars to reduce the amount of sail exposed to the wind. The amount of sail taken in by securing one set of ropes is called a reef. The action of reducing sails is called reefing and the knot that is used to tie the ropes is called a reef knot. In light winds all the reefs are taken out and the full size of the sail is exposed to draw full power from the wind. reeft top sail bree
se with heavy rain and thunder and lightning
we shiped quantitys of water on deck the hatches
perfectly batned down the ship makeing verry
little water          No Observation
In the morning read a portion of scripture
dureing the day employd secureing things abo
ut the decks our cabin on deck floating with
water our beds and most of our wareing apparel
wet…

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 12 June 1836 ]


Monday 13 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

All this 24 hours strong winds from the NWd with heavy rain under close reeft top sail and fore sail takeing on deck quantitys of water Lattd Obsd 36.33 South Longd 21.15 East In the evening read to a few attended in the cabin floating with water a Psalm I felt my own not hingness [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 13 June 1836 ]


Tuesday 14 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

First and midle part of this 24 hours moderate gales with squalls from the NW with rain and an heigh sea latter part more moderate let the reefs out of the top sails and set the top Gt sails Lattd Obsd 36.27 South Longd 24.00 West In the everning read the 104th Psalm to a [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 14 June 1836 ]


Wednesday 15 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses and cloudy but plesent
weather all possable sail set below and aloft
people employd variously Latitude is the distance of a point north or south of the equator as measured in degrees. The poles are at 90 degrees north and south. Lattd  Obsd 36.41 South
In the morning blessed God for a quiet night with
all other mercyes attending it to day beds blankets and
wareing apperil have bing dryed …

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 15 June 1836 ]


Thursday 16 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses and freshning from the NE under duble reeft top sails and spanker reeft with courses and other drawing sails Lattd acc 37.00 South Longd 33.27 East This morning on my knees I found God to be my excedi ng great reward I bless God for the overwelming power of saveing [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 16 June 1836 ]


Friday 17 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

First and midle part of this 24 hours strong winds from the NW attended with squalls of rain and a heigh sea shortd and made sail as needfull latter part more moderate Lattd 37.18 South Longd 36.40 East In the morning read the word of God with prayer and the same time one of the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 17 June 1836 ]


Saturday 18 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours strong winds from the
south PM Where there is more than one line of reef points, a sail is double reefed when the second area of sail is gathered in. duble reeft the top sails and took in the
The mainsail is the lowest sail on the mainmast, as is the fore-sail on the foremast. main sail found that the water had got into one
of our An iron tank rather than a wooden cask used for carrying water or storing bread and other dry provisions. tanks of bread and spoiled abot 50 pound
no Observation
In the everning a few attended service … sung two
hymns for all this a few doese attend but I cannot
go for and aft the deck but I here the wicked letting
forth a flood of bad language

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 18 June 1836 ]


Sunday 19 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours light airs of wind from
the SEd made sail as required Latitude is the distance of a point north or south of the equator as measured in degrees. The poles are at 90 degrees north and south. Lattd  Obsd 36.13 S
Longitude is the distance, measured in degrees, of the meridian on which a point lies to the meridian of Greenwich. On the other side of the earth to Greenwich is a point with a longitude of both 180 degrees east and 180 degrees west. Longitude 41.10 East
In the morning read the word of God with prayer
yesterday one of the crew complained to me being
allmost dead with illness I gave him an Emetic, medicine to cause vomiting. ametick
his complaint being a disordred stomack and stopt
of course his rum to day he says he is quite well
and complains of his rum being stopt and says will
not drink any more ships rum but the first
port if he has to sell his last shirt will buye some
last sunday was a storm of wind and sea this a
storm of man …
…  – in the afternoon we had a prayer
meting with religious instruction in the everning
read the word of God with a surmon the young
man Glansford tell me to read the word of God to
do him good he watches when all is a sleep and draws
the curtain of his little bed place which is about 6 feet
long and 4 feet heigh and four feet whide thus he
reads and prayes

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 19 June 1836 ]


Sunday 26 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SWd all sail set steering SE by E½E Lattd 37.28 South Longd 61.49 East In the morning read with the church service a surm on from the 5th chapt by St Matthew 17th 18th 19th 20th verces in the afternoon the boys Jones and Glansford prayd and sung [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 26 June 1836 ]


Monday 27 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NWd though freshning at times all nessary sail set steering SE by E½E shortd and made sail as required Lattd by acc 37.36 South Longd 65.5 East I have had some sweet love to Jesus to day in the ever ning read to my little flock the Psalms [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 27 June 1836 ]


Tuesday 28 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours mostly strong winds from the NW with a heigh sea all resqusite sail set Steering to the Eastward     Lattd 37.50 South Longd 69.41 East In the everning read to the little flock 8th chapt by Jerimiah Mr Richards and myself prayed and God seemed to be with us the Lord has once [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 28 June 1836 ]


Wednesday 29 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the NWd cloudy weather all resqusite sail set steering SE by E½E No meridian allt In the everning read the 14th chapt of the Gospel of St John to the little flock and found my own soul near to God in Christ after the firey darts of the enemy [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 29 June 1836 ]


Thursday 30 June 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours strong gales from the westward with thick cloudy weather with heavy rains at 8 AM made the Island of about 3 leagues off bearing by compass ENE a heigh sea shipt much water on the deck no Observation I had verry little rest dureing the night was much at [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 30 June 1836 ]


Friday 1 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the NWd with storms of hail and rain all sail set necessary steering ESE Lattd Obsd 39.4 South Longd 82.00 East To day I have bing tryed with the tossing of our bark on the mighty waters our deck and cabin has bing continually afloat my bed wet I [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 1 July 1836 ]


Saturday 2 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours strong winds with rain and a heigh sea the wind from the westward all resqusite sail set steer ing to the Eastward Latt Obsd 38.43 South Longd 86.53 East On reflection to day on the kind providence of God in deliver ing us from the dangers of                         Island I [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 2 July 1836 ]


Sunday 3 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

… To day is the natal yearly return of my beloved partner
…  I desire to bless
God for the gift of my partner once was my Idol but
God has given me to see we must not set up Idols in our
hearts but the love is not lessend but is more firm
and pure founded on the word and promices of
God (from the Hebrew). Jehovah that marage is honorable among men and
aproved by God on earth …
… the thoughts of
home smoths the ruged parths of this life and
the word of God stills the proud waves that whould
founder my poor Ships were generally classed by the way they were rigged for sail. A bark (also spelt barque) is a sailing ship which has: three masts, square sails on the front or forward mast square sails on the middle or mast mast, and triangular sails on the back or mizzen mast. They were relatively small sailing ships in the 1830s. bark the waves that whould beat
on me and overwelm me is stayd by the word of God
…  – we sung the 491st hymn I indea
vourd to be faithfull to the crew I pointed them to
a beutifull rain bow an emblem of the covernant
God has made with falling and raiseing man

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 3 July 1836 ]


Monday 4 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours strong winds from the SW all resqusite sail set steering ESE employd as needfull Lattd Obsd 38.19 South Longd 95.50 East In the everning had family prayer read the Psalm for the day with suited hyms what a mercy a worm is allowed to come to God through Christ

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 4 July 1836 ]


Tuesday 5 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the SW with plesent weather all resqusite sail set steering ESE employd gitting up water Lattd 38.6 S Longd 96.50 East In the morning read the Psalms for the day in the everning did the same to the people in the cabin one of the men spoke on salvation [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 5 July 1836 ]


Wednesday 6 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the westward all sail set steering E by S½S Employd repairing the windlass AM obsd a distance between the  and which gives our longd 99.53 East Lattd Obs 38.15 South In the morning rea the Psalms for the day in the everng read the same to the people I [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 6 July 1836 ]


Thursday 7 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the westward all sail set steering E by S½S AM obsd a distance between and gives our longitud 101.55 East Lattd Obsd 38.3 South the mate made a complaint to me to day that some one has cut of the head of the spare tiller and hove the grind [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 7 July 1836 ]


Friday 8 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the north with hazy weather with all sail set steering E by S½S got the larboard quater boat out no meridn alt Longd 105.36 E In the everning read the Psalms for the day Jones concluded with prayer and prayed lord give us grace to look bak on our [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 8 July 1836 ]


Saturday 9 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the northd all sail set the wind some times shifting to the South with a swell from the west steering E by S shortd and made sail as needfull no Observation Longd 109 8 East – In the everning read to the little flock the everning Psalms Mr Richards [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 9 July 1836 ]


Wednesday 13 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the SE all sail
set fine clear atmisphier with smoth water
at half past 3 PM saw the land of austrilia bearing
ENE at 5 PM a ridge of rock bore by compass
NE by E½E distance 7 leagues Longd 116.28 E Latt
35.35 South…

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 13 July 1836 ]


Friday 15 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NNE plesent weather
all sail set steering E by S saw the land bearing NE
employd gitting up water and provisions
Lattd 36.47 South Longd 119.48 East
Most part of the afternon of this day has bing spent in
controvercy about petty thiefts between the crew and
passengers such ignorence and vice I belive seldom ever
met togather but god knoweth how to deliver out of the
hands of the cruel man..

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 15 July 1836 ]


Thursday 21 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the NE all sail set resq
steering to SEd employd variously saw sperm Whales
going to windward Lattd 36.50 South Long 131.14 East

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 21 July 1836 ]


Sunday 24 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours moderate gales from the north under sail as resqusite moderate sail Lattd Obs 38.10 South Longd 135.10 East We had four good meetings to day reading the word of god praying singing and christain conference the sea is heigh but God in the heavens heigher Christ in all places [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 24 July 1836 ]


Monday 25 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses from the NW all resqusite sail set standing to the Northward employd getting up water Latt 37.38 South Longitude 135.21 East In the everning had a prayer meeting read the everning Psalms sung three hymns three prayed with thier voice but I belive all prayd with thier hearts god was [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 25 July 1836 ]


Tuesday 26 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SW with plesent weather all sail set at 8 AM saw the Island of Kangaroo a head bearing by compass NNE at 5 PM shortd in sail to the two top sails cape boder beari ng SW wedge Island south althorp Island bearing NE run dureing the night a moderate distance from Kangaroo Island Lattd at noon 35.56 South In the everning held a prayermeeting read the 20th chapt of Acts four prayed sung ceveral hymns and found it good to pray in all most sight of our haven – last night was a lovely night I was up most of the saw covernant bow which spoke the promices of Jehovah

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 26 July 1836 ]


Wednesday 27 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses and clear weather
AM we ran down close to the reefe which forms the
harbour of nepean bay found the entrance and
at 10 or half past came to anchor in three
fathoms water in neapean bay gave the
ship 30 fathoms cable but we found we had not
preceived it was flood tide and at ebb found our
selves aground NB at 10 PM in 2 fathoms water but perfectly safe
the water being perfectly smooth we got out all our
boats and anchored them in shore and got ready
for moveing when the tide suits we landed the
colonan manager and Mr Bear and we went to gather
to look for the lagoon but had to return unsucksess
full night comeing on
In the everning had family worship I could not
but see and admire the singular hand of god in our
safe deliverance through the track less ocean and bring
ing us safe to these uncultivated shores no sooner than
we had come to anchor and the sails firld than a
covenant bow extended its self on shore from one bow
of the ship to the other in all its beauty O how true
is Jehovah to his promices to his family on earth
how good has he bing to us when passing through
the tempestious ocean my peace flowed like a
river not a cloud did arise to darken the skys
or hide for a moment my Lord from my eyes
once more was I enabled to bow before the Lord on
the land

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 27 July 1836 ]


Thursday July 28 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

…Mr Stevens, Mr Bear and myself went in search of the salt and fresh water lagoon and in our way found a fresh water river entrance from the sea we went up about 5 miles we saw a few swans and a great quantity of ducks Mr Stevens gave the river the name of Morgan by christen it with brandy at 7 PM we returnd on board Mr Richards was at prayers with the little flock after the days adventures I was tired and wanted rest

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday July 28 1836 ]


Friday 29 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours passing showers of rain employd gitting up casks for the raft Mr Stevens went on shore with four men to dig for water he gave them directions and we took a boat and went to the river morgan to seek for foul to refresh crew and passengers at midnight [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 29 July 1836 ]


Saturday 30 July 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours passing squalls of heavy rain in consequence of the trees falling over the river on each side we could not git the boat close to the bank and took some refreshment and left the boat to trace the river along but by trying to cut of some bush that [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 30 July 1836 ]


Sunday 31 July 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours passing showers of rain in the fore
noon had prayers in the cabin with a surmon
13th chapt of Hebs 5th verce in the afternoon instruct
ed the children I was sent for by Mrs Bear one of
our passengers who is in a deranged state of mind
with four helpless babes to look to her as a mother
I think the means used for her is too hars not suited
to the case I read and reasoned with her but I
am afraid to little perpose in the everning
we had service on the quater deck read the 13th chapt
of epist of Hebs read a surmon and exhorted the people
we commenced and ended with prayer and sung allso
so concluded with this day the first in this port
Mr Stevens and Mr Bear on shore erecting a tent
for Mrs Bear with desire to git her on shore as soon
as posable beliveing it the best

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 31 July 1836 ]


Monday 1 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours light winds from the north employd gitting some of the pasengers things on shore Mrs Bear went on shore under verry trying circumstances and verry painfull – in the afternoon Mr Stevens and myself went to the east part of the bay of shoals we found a large well [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 1 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 2 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses from the North
early this morning Mr Stevens Captn Ross and
myself went to the river in search of the boat
and if posable to git some whild foul in walking
along the side of the river on the oppersite side
I saw a man some what like when a boy I have
seen Robinson cruso with long hair and beard a
stick in his hand and verry little apparel/clothing apperil I
put to him a few questions which he answered
said he had bing here since 1832 had a farm
by the side of the river with another man and
had come down in search of swans eggs by this
time Mr Stevens came up who was behind in
the boat the man turned back and we
accompanied him to his farm which was
closed in with piles drove in the ground conta
ining about five acres of weat some turnips
cabages onions and a few pertatoes they have
pigs and fouls a fine cat we where introduced to
the partner of our friend who appeared to be a
rough sailor though left of sea and had bing
on the island about      years and had become
quite nativefied his voice appeard to have lost
his mother tongue as regards voice they said
they had two women lived with them which
they called Aboriginal women, from dyin in the langauge of the Sydney area, usually used perjoratively jins and they where gone to catch
wallaby that is a small kind of Kangaroo
Mr Stevens invited them to come with thier wives
to see him on sunday and have a religious ser
vice but says the man to introduce our wives whould
be like introduceing a dog to you presence they
lived in small one story leve with the ground
houses had out houses for thier stock I promiced
to give them some Essay or pamphlet, generally on a religious topic. tracts with a Bible each
in the everning returned on board with some
ducks and a swan and found my own crew and
the Lady Mary Pelham’s L M Pelhams and the people on shore had re
fused duty I had prayers in the cabin with
the mate two foremast men and the two
apprentices and found Mrs Bear much worse

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 2 August 1836 ]


Wednesday 3 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours mostly strong winds attended
with rain I had the people called on the quater
deck to know the reason they refused to land the
passengers things they sayd Mr Stevens had promiced
them fivety pounds and they whould not work till
he paid them so I let it stand till farther advice
the two men came from the farm Mr Stevens was
not on board but had bing makeing signals
on shore and no one preceived him
we had family prayer in the everning I went
to bed as usal and was disturbed some time after
by hereing Mr Stevens going on in a most unman
ly way it appears he was hurt in not being heard
when these men where on board for he wanted to
be on board to receive them I heard him say it
was an eternal disgrace to the captain an eternal
disgrace to the officers and crew and he should
write to the directors and inform them and he was
a magestrate and so on and said he should like
to see the captain but surposed I was asleep so I got
up and told him what I thought of his conduct
dureing the time I have had to be with him as to
his moral conduct I have known when we have
bing in our extrimities he has bing lost and as his
conduct towards Mr Bear and family has bing
such as no one but whould disapprove off he has
came into the cabin tore down the curtains got
a horse wip and thretned to horse wip Mrs Bear
and has told Mr Bear in the hereing of his wife
that he whould banish him and his family to
any part of the Island and cut off his supplys
the poor whoman is now raveing mad with four
helpless babes on board with the sister of Mr Bears
who is over come with the good qualities of Mr Stevens
at the age of fivety Mr B disapproves of such conduct
well god makes the ungodly his rod but either to
they can come and no farther Mr Stevens I under
stand has bing down where the people lives and
paid them fivety pounds – so ended this day

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 3 August 1836 ]


Thursday 4 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the westward AM got under weigh and moved the ship where we intend to land the colonian stores came to anchor in about     fathoms water with 18 fathoms cable made a raft and got it along side ready for discha rgeing in the everning had family prayer ten attended [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 4 August 1836 ]


Friday 5 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and rain at times employd gitting the stores on shore In the everning had family prayers eleven attended the times are trying iniquity abounds curseing and swareing is where ever you are most of the L M Pelhams crew serve the prince of the power of the air and in [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 5 August 1836 ]


Saturday 6 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and rain all hands employd gitting on shore the companys stores in the everning cleaned down the deck for sabath In the everning read the 33d chapt of Ezekiel to four souls I found it good to wate on god iniquity still abounds

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 6 August 1836 ]


Sunday 7 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds from the NWd we had three services this day one in the forenoon read with the church service a surmon from gens 6th chapt 17.18 verce taught the boys in the afternoon in the everning delive a surmon from 12th gen 4th verce I found it good to serve god [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 7 August 1836 ]


Monday 8 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NW employd all day gitting the companys things on shore In the everning had family worship read part of the 3d chapt of St Johns gospel to as many as whould attend Mr Richards and myself prayed O how good to have the Father of our Lord Jesus [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 8 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 9 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours mostly strong winds from the SWd
employd getting the companys stores on shore and
received on board 13 casks of beef and pork three men refused duty today
In the evening had family prayer a few attended
read the 1st [?] chapt epist of St Peter.

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 9 August 1836 ]


Wednesday 10 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

Most part of this 24 hours calms and light winds employed getting the companys things on short and stowing our own away In the everning had family prayer read the 3d chapt of St Peter I find it a good and plesent thing to love the Lord to be able to cast my care on [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 10 August 1836 ]


Thursday 11 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses from the NE employd clearing the decks. I took a boat and sounded the harbor In the everning had family prayer read the 4th chapt St Peter found the word profitable and powerfull to [h]eal the wounded soul in shore wher no eye seese nor ear [h]ears but our gods [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 11 August 1836 ]


Friday 12 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the North employd shifting our dry provitions in a dry and safe place in the after hold I took three men with me to the well to git it cleard out and sink a cask to git our water it is about 5 miles from the ship or rather [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 12 August 1836 ]


Saturday 13 August 1836

[, on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and clear weather at half past 6 AM hove up the anchor and moved the ship but came to anchor again for want of water over the flats at 1 PM hove up again and moved to a more convenent place for wood and water we anchored in quater less [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 13 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 13 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light wind and A squall is a sudden, sharp increase in wind speed. squalls with rain
employd cutting wood and other nessary work the carp
enter reparing the boats
In the everning had family worship read the word
of god with singing and prayer

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 13 September 1836 ]


Sunday 14 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

I  took Miss Bear and the children on shore early
this morning and found Mr Stevens had
bing in trouble all night in the L M Pelhams crew

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 14 August 1836 ]


Monday 15 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours mostly increasing breeses employd as needfull I went with a crew to the well for water it yealds little returned with two casks In the everning had family prayer I found the throne of grace yeald more of the waters of eternal life than the well we where dipping at did yeald [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 15 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 15 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… 8 AM the John Pirie hove
in sight I took a boat and went on board and
piloted him and welcomed Captn Martin
crew and passengers to nepean bay …

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 15 August 1836 ]


Wednesday 17 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and clear weather employd mostly watering the ship a few taring five sick took 8 casks left 2 men all night to fill. In the everning had family prayer

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 17 August 1836 ]


Thursday 18 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours calms and clear weather employd taring the riggin and watering I attended the watering party the seacond mate being some time sick In the everning had family prayer I felt it a blessing to draw nigh to god at a throne of grace and tell him all my cares and troubles

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 18 August 1836 ]


Friday 19 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and clear weather employd watering and other jobs as needfull after the employment of the day had family prayer and lay down tired and warey

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 19 August 1836 ]


Saturday 20 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses and clear weather employd watering and cleaning the ship In the everning had family prayer we belive God heard and answered prayer

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 20 August 1836 ]


Sunday 21 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours fresh breeses and plesent weather in the morning fitted up the quater deck for publick worship at the usual time hoisted the bethel flag at the main and sent a boat to the John Perie and one on shore for the people to attend and being no minister and no church bell [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 21 August 1836 ]


Monday 22 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… – It is painful to here of
the conduct of our colonial manager how he commits
himself where ever he goes drunkenness is his prevailing
sin and even leaves sailors to put him to bed
a man who has the care of thousands of pounds and
the wellfare of men whomen and children under
his direction the people on shore are like sheep going
astray drunkeness thieft & swareing are the prevailing
sins of this infant establishment and no one to say
and be faithfull that the land is poluted git thee
up hence – what will these poor degraded heathen
say see how these christains live how holy and
happy let me be a christain no no they cannot tell
the truth and say so – but still we hope thing may
have a turn they cannot last this way

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 22 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 23 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong gales from the NEd let go the seacond anchor in consequence of the first draging sent a boat to the north cape to fetch our two men that where filling water I went on the rapid to give honour due to whom it is dew saw cournal Light was received kindly [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 23 August 1836 ]


Wednesday 24 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the west sent two boats to fetch the water at 4 PM they returned with six casks the L M Pellam sailed to day and anchored out side the doctor of the Rapid visited our sick and gives little hopes of the young man Bachlor In the everning held [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 24 August 1836 ]


Thursday 25 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… I had the people
called aft to know if they where satisfied to have Mr
Dorey as third mate all was willing but Jones and
Jameson We had family prayers after the employ of the day

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 25 August 1836 ]


Friday 26 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours squally with rain we tracked our casks from the Island to the well and returned with 5 full employed otherwise as needfull In the everning had family prayer read the 3d chapt by Hebrews

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 26 August 1836 ]


Saturday 27 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and cloudy weather sent one boat to fetch the men from the watering place and employd clearing and cleaning the decks we sent a boat to the L M Pellam and received 5 oars In the everning had family prayer and prayed for a speritual sabath the doctor of the [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 27 August 1836 ]


Sunday 28 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… in the afternoon Jones & Glansford and myself
went on shore and in the bush by the sea side we
powered out our prayer at a throne of grace and
was refreshed in the wilderness in the settlement they
had the coulours flying and the fidle playing and dancing
selebrating a sailors weding Captn Martain had maried
them one of his crew to one of the emigrants

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 28 August 1836 ]


Monday 29 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours moderate breeses from the south employd taring painting and fitting the riggin In the everning had family prayer in the cabin

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 29 August 1836 ]


Tuesday 30 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours calms and plesent weather employd taring painting and other nessary work we cleard our anchors and chains being foul I went on shore to pray in seacreat but found a brother in adversity and indeavoured to bind up his wounds we met in the evening we met I felt some love towards [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 30 August 1836 ]


Wednesday 31 August 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours calms and plesent weather employd painting taring and other jobs as needfull we caught a few fish of the salmon kind We had family service in the everning but as it was late and we tired the service was dull I hope by gods grace to be more [h]artyer for the futer

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 31 August 1836 ]


Thursday 1 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the south attended with rain employd as needfull a party cutting wood a sail in sight In the evening held a prayer meeting in the cabin 4 prayed I belive god in Christ was in the midst of us the young man Glansford says O Lord do strengthing us [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 1 September 1836 ]


Friday 2 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours squally weather from the NW to SW employd wooding and other nessary jobs the doctor of the Rapid visited the sick to day we let go the seacond anchor blowing hard In the everning had family prayers in the cabin

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 2 September 1836 ]


Saturday 3 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… In the everning had family worship Mrs Bear is
much better and I had the pleasure of seeing her
children restored to her and she acknoledge them which
she has not lately, I believe this is an answer to prayers.

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 3 September 1836 ]


Sunday 4 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Sunday      September 4th 1836 This 24 hours light wind from the SW attended with passing showers we held a prayermeeting in the cabin before breackfast and in the forenoon hoisted the bethel flag and some of the John Piries crew and some from the shore with our own crew and Mr Bears children attended with [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 4 September 1836 ]


Monday 5 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Monday September 5th 1836
This 24 hours light winds with passing showers of rain.
In the morning sent a boat to fetch our water from the well
and another for the doctor of the Rapid to tend the sick
which he kindly offers his services to. I took a boat and went
to the Pellam has we have had no communication since
she returned. I found Captn Ross in difficulties only himself
to carry on the dutys of the Ship with one mate and him
abed sick the widow of the late chief officer in her cabin sick
allso and no doctor to attend them the Captn dissatisfied
with all round him.

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 5 September 1836 ]


Tuesday 6 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Teusday           September 6th 1836 This 24 hours fine plesent weather with wind from the SEd sent 11 casks for water to the well received on board 10 casks of flower 4 beef 4 pork 60 gall treakle for the use of the crew some of the people empd painting the Ship  ____ In the evening [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 6 September 1836 ]


Wednesday 7 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Wedensday          September 7th 1836 This 24 hours light wind and calms received on board 20 casks of water from the well and 6 casks of salt provitions for ships use got on board our boats from the beach carpenter employd fitting boats davids the Rapid saild out In the everning had family prayer read to [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 7 September 1836 ]


Thursday 8 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Thursday           September 8th 1836 This 24 hours gentle breeses from the SE sent some water casks to the well some people wooding and some pain ting dried the sails carpenter employd fitting a boat and other work as needfull In the everning had family prayer read a lecture on the parable of the sower delivered [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 8 September 1836 ]


Friday 9 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Friday September 9th 1836
This 24 hours strong winds at times at ½ past 5 in the mor
ning I left the ship with one boat to procure some vegatable
to one of the sealers farms we rowed about 13 miles and
landed at the farm a most miseryable place We began
to dig pertatoes and percured about half a sack we got a few
turnips and some cabages seeing a sail off the farm I went
on board and found it to be the Cignet with 99 men women
and Children on board and the 100th born while on board
which was a girl this ship was to be here as soon as ourselves
but is 45 days after so much for bosting they have all bing preserved in
health and safety but curseing swareing on board in abundance
the surveyors where thankfull for my little services in pointing out to
them the harbour for which they where extremely wellcome

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 9 September 1836 ]


Saturday 10 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

Saturday           September 10th 1836 This 24 hours blowing hard from the SE I still keept on board of the Cignet we where beating towards the harbour and make ing but little way heareing the people giveing three chears foreward I in inquired and found it was on account of the birth of the before mentioned [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 10 September 1836 ]


Sunday 11 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the eastward I left the Cignet safe to anchor and returned on board found the officers and crew all well and was kindly received by them for which I decire to be gratefull. For Allmighty god and saviour and for keeping them and me and hope to be made [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 11 September 1836 ]


Monday 12 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours strong winds from the southd attended with rain employd wooding and other jobs as needfull carpenter fitting the boats In the evening had family worship read the 32d chapt of exidous with comment sung and found god to be Jehovah sung with melody in our hearts – I find to day that [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 12 September 1836 ]


Wednesday 14 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and squally attended with calms employd cutting wood and doing other nessary work carpenter repareing the boats we found some fine chaulck and procured some for Ships use In the evening had family service read part of 16th chapt of St John with commentry

[ Read the full journal for: Wednesday 14 September 1836 ]


Thursday 15 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the southd at day light sent two boats for water at 3 they returned with 9 casks got off two boat loads of wood carpenter repairing the spare boat the painter repareing the boats oars In the morning being foreward on deck in looking down the fore hatchway swareing [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Thursday 15 September 1836 ]


Friday 16 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours light winds and rain at times employd
prepairing for sea…
…  bless the Lord O my soul may my beloved wife and children
be the care of the all wise all mercifull Creator Redeemer & santifier

[ Read the full journal for: Friday 16 September 1836 ]


Saturday 17 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NWd AM prepared to git
under weigh at noon unmoored ship and got under weigh
came to anchor faceing the setlement in 4 A fathom is a measure of depth in the imperial system. One fathom is equal to six feet or 1.83 metres. fathoms water
cleared the decks down and prepaired for sabath…

[ Read the full journal for: Saturday 17 September 1836 ]


Sunday 18 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

…in the forenoon
the The flag of the Bethel Union, a seaman’s missionary organisation with the word Bethel (House of God) blazened across a blue background with a star above and a dove with olive branch below. The flag was used by various organisations such as Angas’ British and Foreign Sailors’ Society to indicate that a church service was taking place aboard a ship in harbour. bethel (House of God) blazened across a blue background with a star above and a dove with olive branch below. The flag was used by various organisations such as Angas’ British and Foreign Sailors’ Society to indicate that a church service was taking place aboard a ship in harbour.”] bethel flag [/tooltip] being hoisted ceveral came on board with
which three females Mrs Bear who came out with us was
one being restored nearly to her right mind and to her children…

[ Read the full journal for: Sunday 18 September 1836 ]


Monday 19 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

… I took a boat and
went to the new setlement wher the Cignet landed her
emegrants they have twelve military tents erected and
all the emegrants emplyd some building a store house
out of bussh and Captn Lipson building a bussh house
for part of his large family some cooking and so on
we dined with Dr Wright and family in his tent all
in this setlement seems to be carryed on with experdition
and order and serbordernation we returned to the other
setlement I found three of my crew drunken Clavil
Lidard and Spratly we had no disturbance with them
we had a meeting and conferance spoke mostly on
drunkeness I knew in one ship of three cases men loosing
thier lives through drunkeness

[ Read the full journal for: Monday 19 September 1836 ]


Tuesday 20 September 1836

[, who arrived in South Australia on board the wrote.]

This 24 hours gentle breeses from the NE fine weather at 7 fired a gun a signal for sailing and hove in some cable at 9 hove the anchor off the ground but found the vessel canted the rong way gave the ship cable again and got out the cadge to cant the ship hove [...]

[ Read the full journal for: Tuesday 20 September 1836 ]


css.php