Ships’ rigging

Ships were broadly classified according to the way they were rigged – that is, according to their masts and Yards are horizontal poles that are suspended from the masts to support and spread the square sails. They are basically set square to the ship's centre line but the angle can be adjusted to suit the direction of the wind. yards  and the sails they carried. The ships that sailed for South Australia in 1836 included barques, A sailing vessel with two square-rigged masts. brigs , A schooner is a vessel with two masts, the main mast is taller than the forward mast and the largest sail on each mast is a fore and aft sail. schooners  and a fully-rigged Ship can be a confusing term because it actually has two meanings. Its common meaning is an ocean-going vessel that is larger than a boat. When used in that sense, a ship can be rigged in many different ways. In strict maritime usage ship also has a second meaning. It names a specific type of rig. A ship has a bowsprit and three masts and it carries square sails on all three masts. ship .

The Africaine, the Cygnet, the Duke of York, the Lady Mary Pelham and the Tam O’Shanter were rigged as barques for their 1836 voyages.  That means they had three masts: the foremast and main masts carried square sails but the The third mast, or the mast immediately aft of the main-mast. Typically shorter than the fore-mast. mizzen mast  carried fore and aft sails. Square sails were laced to the yards and set square or perpendicular to the masts, so they generally ran across the breadth of the ship. Fore and aft sails were the triangular sails that were tied to the masts and set so that they generally ran fore and aft or from the front to the back of the ship.

The Emma and the Rapid were small vessels rigged as brigs. That means that they had two masts and the largest sails on each mast were square sails.

The John Pirie was a schooner. That means that it had two masts: the main mast was taller than the forward mast and the largest sail on each was a fore and aft sail.

The Buffalo was a fully-rigged ship. Ship can be a confusing term because it actually has two meanings. Its common meaning is an ocean-going vessel that is larger than a boat. When used in that sense, a ship can be rigged in many different ways. In strict maritime usage ship also has a second meaning. It names a specific type of rig. A ship had a A spar (or pole) extending from the bow of a sailing vessel. bowsprit and three masts and it carried square sails on all three masts.

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